WHO I AM - Over fifty, living in Southern California for the last 10 years or so. Father. Truly in love with the most amazing woman I've ever known. I enjoy the pursuit of knowledge. I prefer savory to sweet. I love to travel and explore what the world has to offer. I like both form and function; the rain and the sun; peoples faces (and their bodies), but mostly their thoughts and soul; what we construct, what we consume, and what we should protect.

WHAT I POST – I reblog that which I find aesthetically appealing or intriguing: architecture, art, design, light, nature, the physical form and world are of special interest. Occasionally I post an original photo or thought. I try to have a cup of coffee each morning and I always try to celebrate the coming and going of the sun.

COPYRIGHT – I do not claim copyright to any of these images unless I specifically say otherwise on an image-by-image basis. If you are the copyright owner of a picture or video I post and would like it removed or credited, just let me. No problem and no harm intended.

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from 365 Parisiens with 52 notes

365parisiens:

#208 — “I can’t remember the name, but there were a writer who took a photo per day also” © 365 Parisiens by Constantin Mashinskiy – Tumblr – Facebook

365parisiens:

#208 — “I can’t remember the name, but there were a writer who took a photo per day also”
© 365 Parisiens by Constantin Mashinskiy – TumblrFacebook

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Humans of New York with 2,068 notes

humansofnewyork:

“Normally when I photograph a couple, I ask for you to tell me your favorite thing about him, and for you to tell me your favorite thing about her.”“Fuck.”

humansofnewyork:

“Normally when I photograph a couple, I ask for you to tell me your favorite thing about him, and for you to tell me your favorite thing about her.”
“Fuck.”

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from benbrahemb with 16 notes

29th July 2014

Post reblogged from Me, me and... Oh, me again with 444,439 notes

substiel:

Some guy just whistled at me while driving by and my dad goes “don’t worry, that was for me”

29th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from kate or die! with 171,271 notes

kateordie:

Dowling Duncan and redesigning the American Dollar:

Why the size?
We have kept the width the same as the existing dollars. However we have changed the size of the note so that the one dollar is shorter and the 100 dollar is the longest. When stacked on top of each other it is easy to see how much money you have. It also makes it easier for the visually impaired to distinguish between notes.

Why a vertical format?
When we researched how notes are used we realized people tend to handle and deal with money vertically rather than horizontally. You tend to hold a wallet or purse vertically when searching for notes. The majority of people hand over notes vertically when making purchases. All machines accept notes vertically. Therefore a vertical note makes more sense.

Why different colors?
It’s one of the strongest ways graphically to distinguish one note from another.

Why these designs?
We wanted a concept behind the imagery so that the image directly relates to the value of each note. We also wanted the notes to be educational, not only for those living in America but visitors as well. Each note uses a black and white image depicting a particular aspect of American history and culture. They are then overprinted with informational graphics or a pattern relating to that particular image.

$1 – The first African American president
$5 – The five biggest native American tribes
$10 – The bill of rights, the first 10 amendments to the US Constitution
$20 – 20th Century America
$50 – The 50 States of America
$100 – The first 100 days of President Franklin Roosevelt. During this time he led the congress to pass more important legislations than most presidents pass in their entire term. This helped fight the economic crises at the time of the great depression. Ever since, every new president has been judged on how well they have done during the first 100 days of their term.

I get so annoyed with Americans who make fun of Canadian currency because it’s “Monopoly Money.” What? Our currency is multicoloured, see-through, holographic and almost indestructible! I guess that’s not as cool as being impossible to tell apart, wrinkly, bland and super easy to rip?

These designs are slick as hell, though.

Source: ickyfunk

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Hell No AP Euro with 76 notes

apeurohist:

“Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (1805-1859) was a French political thinker and historian best known for his Democracy in America (appearing in two volumes: 1835 and 1840) and The Old Regime and the Revolution (1856). In both of these works, he explored the effects of the rising  equality of social conditions on the individual and the state in western  societies. Democracy in America (1835), his major work, published after his travels in the United States, is today considered an early work of sociology and political science.
An eminent representative of the classical liberal political tradition, Tocqueville was an active participant in French politics, first under the July Monarchy (1830–1848) and then during the Second Republic (1849–1851) which succeeded the February 1848 Revolution. He retired from political life after Louis Napoléon Bonaparte's 2 December 1851 coup, and thereafter began work on The Old Regime and the Revolution, Volume I.”
-Wiki

Happy Birthday Alexis de Tocqueville

apeurohist:

Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (1805-1859) was a French political thinker and historian best known for his Democracy in America (appearing in two volumes: 1835 and 1840) and The Old Regime and the Revolution (1856). In both of these works, he explored the effects of the rising equality of social conditions on the individual and the state in western societies. Democracy in America (1835), his major work, published after his travels in the United States, is today considered an early work of sociology and political science.

An eminent representative of the classical liberal political tradition, Tocqueville was an active participant in French politics, first under the July Monarchy (1830–1848) and then during the Second Republic (1849–1851) which succeeded the February 1848 Revolution. He retired from political life after Louis Napoléon Bonaparte's 2 December 1851 coup, and thereafter began work on The Old Regime and the Revolution, Volume I.”

-Wiki

Happy Birthday Alexis de Tocqueville

29th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Eloquent and Honest with 354 notes

There are many men of principle in both parties in America, but there is no party of principle.
— Alexis de Tocqueville  (via eloquentandhonest)

Happy Birthday Alexis de Tocqueville

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from In Times Gone By with 144 notes

intimesgonebyblog:

feuille-d-automne:

Paul Cézanne

One of my favourite painters.

intimesgonebyblog:

feuille-d-automne:

Paul Cézanne

One of my favourite painters.

Source: feuille-d-automne

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from almost touchable...a with 908 notes

Source: the60stwist

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Maps on the Web with 834 notes

theeconomist:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

theeconomist:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

Source: theeconomist